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Posts Tagged ‘video’

Handbrake 0.9.5 Released

January 5, 2011 Leave a comment

Handbrake is one of the very few, functionally mature open source video transcoding tools with a decent, usable user interface (of course command line options are still available).
 
Generally the Handbrake development team take a long time between official releases, and v0.9.5 is no exception. This latest version comes more than a full calendar year after the previous milestone release.

While Handbrake doesn’t support a wide range of broadcast video formats, which would be a nice addition for me personally, this is not really their target market. Handbrake does a great job on web targeted and home use video encoding jobs. Ripping Blu-Ray DVDs, encoding for Apple TV2 and advanced finite controls for H.264 transcoding are all now supported in the latest release.

Further details about the release available here.

Discussion thread, specific to this release, available here.

Multi-platform downloads found here.

General Open Source NLE Round-Up

November 10, 2010 Leave a comment

It’s been quite a while since I’ve posted any open source NLE updates, and there have been new releases across the board. Here’s a quick round-up of a few noticeable updates.

KDENLive (http://www.kdenlive.org)
Version: 0.7.8
Released: September 14th, 2010
Updates: Improved tools for color correction, improved UI for effects
(you can now adjust some transitions and effects directly on the
monitor), track effects, improved slideshows.

PiTiVi (http://www.pitivi.org/)
Version: 0.13.5
Released: September 21st, 2010
Updates: Periodic backup of the current project file, easy crossfading transitions by overlapping clips, better icon metaphors for link/unlink actions, pixel-perfect icons for various toolbar icons, new “add keyframe” button (and keyboard shortcut), the “missing plugins” installer has been fixed.

OpenShot (http://www.openshotvideo.com)
Version: 1.2.2
Released:
September 21st, 2010
Updates:
Improved Stability, 3D Animated Titles, Custom Transitions, New Audio & Video Effects, Time-line Improvements / Animations, Improved Effects User Interface, Improved Theme Engine, Razor Improvements, Improved Language Support, New DVD Export, Improved Preferences Dialogue, Improved Exporting of different frame-rates.

LiVES (http://lives.sourceforge.net)
Version: 1.0.10
Released: October 15th, 2010
Updates: Backported fixes from development branch.


Updates on WebM Support – All Aboard!

June 2, 2010 Leave a comment

As could probably be predicted, there’s been a lot more press around WebM over the last ten days or so. A few articles are worth noting.

CNET posted a reasonably ordinary piece regarding the quality of WebM, when compared against H.264. However, there were two interesting links in this piece. 
The first pointed to a WebM project page where the indepth encoding parameters for WebM content are outlined. If you’re planning to create WebM files, reading this page is essential. 
The second link, to the quAVlive website provides some various examples of H.264 (using x264) encoding compared against WebM. I can’t really see a lot of visual difference in the “Sunflower” example. However, it is easily clear to my eyes, without even enlarging the screenshots, that in “Park Joy” and “Riverbed” H.264 is certainly superior. I would like to have seen more information regarding the time taken to transcode these examples, with each codec, and the resulting file sizes. Picture quality isn’t always everything, transcode time and storage requirements should also be taken into consideration.
Everyone’s jumping on the WebM bandwagon with software and hardware support. Gstreamer claims full plugin support, which means in turn there is Moovida support and the Transmaggedon transcoder can also output VP8 codec files, although not in the Matroska/WebM container yet. Not to be outdone, Flumotion, will also stream live VP8/WebM content. The Miro Video Converter will also output valid VP8/WebM files, claiming to be the first to do so. The list could go on, but the easiest thing is to probably just keep tabs on the WebM project page listing all the supported devices and software tools, both commercial and open source.
Also worth a shout is the fact that both Mozilla and Opera are pushing for VP8/WebM to be specifically included in the HTML5 specification. Previously, major browser makers couldn’t agree on one specific video file format – Mozilla and Opera backing Ogg Theora and Apple sticking with H.264. I can’t see that particular situation changing now. 

FFmpeg Makes an Official Release!

March 10, 2009 Leave a comment

It’s been a long while since I’ve posted on this blog, but finally today something has spurned me into action. 

The FFmpeg team have finally made a release – version 0.5 – with a silly long name. Previously, users were always told to download and compile the latest SVN version of FFmpeg, if they expected any support from the mailing lists.
Now it would seem that there is a stable release, only a few years since the last one, that can be used by software developers and packagers everywhere. I still expect that many mailing list issues will be dealt with by the instruction to download from the SVN or Git repository and compile. I also expect that bug fixes and enhancements will make it into SVN quite quickly, but that also the next release might be some time away.
Release notes are available on the FFmpeg changelog (long!) and there’s a lively, as always, Slashdot discussion around this momentous event.

Open Movie Editor – New Release Feb 9th

February 10, 2008 Leave a comment

The Open Movie Editor project has just released a new version of this Linux based non-linear video editing tool.

Amongst the highlights of this new version are the following items:

  • Inclusion of a new colour scheme called Shark
  • Colour scheme preferences are now restored at restart

Full release notes are available on Sourceforge.

While only a minor update to Open Movie Editor, coming just one week after the previous release on February 3rd, this source does include my first codebase contribution to an Open Source project – the Shark colour scheme.

Download the new version of Open Movie Editor.

The Future of Cinelerra

February 8, 2008 Leave a comment

It would be remiss if I did not at least mention the current buzz around Linux video editing tool Cinelerra. An article appeared on Linux.com a couple of days ago, outlining a new direction for the software that began life as Broadcast2000.

I’m not going to do a Cinelerra history lesson here, go and read the Linux.com article. What is more interesting is the desire to build a new Cinelerra (Cin3), completely divorced from the original Heroine Warrior sponsor.

I’ve actually been following the Cin3 discussion on the Cinelerra mailing list for some time now. At this stage discussion seems to be centered around what the new name for the software will be and what GUI toolkit to use. There’s a long way to go before Cin3 – or Verite as it may now be known – becomes a stable usable product.

And that’s where the problem lies. Cin3 may be another 2 or 3 years away from being production ready. What happens in the meantime? How much effort will be expended on developing and maintaining the existing Cinelerra 2? While such a long lead time may be needed for a community driven application of this complexity, it does open the opportunity for other projects, both commercial and Open Source, to carve out a large video editing market share on the Linux platform.

Already Blender incorporates a reasonably full featured video sequence editor. I wonder about the viability of spinning that off as a standalone piece of software. What if MainConcept did indeed decide to open source their now defunct MainActor editing tool? Perhaps Adobe, or Sony, or Pinnacle will take the plunge and release a Linux version of their video editors. If the Linux desktop continues to rise in popularity, these scenarios are distinct possibilities.

Already Cinelerra suffers from an image problem, allegedly being too complex to learn and generally unstable. Let’s hope the Cinelerra community team can forge ahead quickly to create an easy to use, but powerful, open source non-linear video editor.

Videos from linux.conf.au 2008

February 5, 2008 1 comment

The organisers of linux.conf.au have done a fantastic job in making all presentations and tutorials available to watch online – in Ogg Theora format naturally. If you were disappointed to miss out on linux.conf.au, this is the next best thing to being there.

For readers of Stream #0 the following items from the main conference may be of most interest:

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

For a full list of videos from the main conference presentations, go to the main presentation page on the linux.conf.au site and the find the presentation you’re most insterested in.

In parallel to the main linux.conf.au, there was also a Multimedia Mini-conf and the good news is, videos are available online for these presentations too!

  • Foundations of Open Media Software workshop summary [OGG]
    [SPX]
  • Dirac Video Compression System [OGG]
    [SPX]
  • FOSS Codecs for Online Video: Usability, Uptake and Development [OGG]
    [SPX]
  • Lightning Talks [OGG]
    [SPX]
  • Survivor Melanesia – Ethnomusicologist vs Annodex [OGG]
    [SPX]
  • Adventures in Consumer Electronics with GStreamer [OGG]
    [SPX]
  • Ingex – tapeless television production using Linux. [OGG]
    [SPX]

A full listing from all Mini-confs is also available.

There goes the rest of your day!

How-To: Find and Extract Video File Details

January 22, 2008 Leave a comment

Using FFMpeg it is relatively simple to query an existing video file to find details such as video codec, audio codec, bitrates, duration and dimensions.

Use the following FFmpeg command in a terminal window:

ffmpeg -i input_file.extension

FFmpeg will just open your input file without doing anything to it. Something like this will be returned in the terminal window:

phillc@phillc-laptop:~$ ffmpeg -i 848_Termi.mov
FFmpeg version SVN-r11213, Copyright (c) 2000-2007 Fabrice Bellard, et al.
configuration: –enable-gpl –enable-pp –enable-libvorbis
–enable-libtheora –enable-liba52 –enable-libdc1394 –enable-libgsm
–enable-libmp3lame –enable-libfaad –enable-libfaac –enable-libxvid
–enable-pthreads –enable-libx264
libavutil version: 49.6.0
libavcodec version: 51.49.0
libavformat version: 52.2.0
built on Dec 13 2007 20:20:36, gcc: 4.1.3 20070929 (prerelease) (Ubuntu 4.1.2-16ubuntu2)
Input #0, mov,mp4,m4a,3gp,3g2,mj2, from ‘848_Termi.mov':
Duration: 00:00:51.7, start: 0.000000, bitrate: 862 kb/s
Stream #0.0(eng): Video: h264, yuv420p, 480×360 [PAR 0:1 DAR 0:1], 25.00 tb(r)
Stream #0.1(eng): Audio: mpeg4aac, 44100 Hz, stereo
Must supply at least one output file

All very interesting, but what if you want to do something more with this information, like write it to a file for use in another program, or just want a more convenient way of viewing the details without having to remember an FFmpeg command? Write a small script to do the work for you. Here’s one I created earlier in Perl…….

#!/usr/bin/perl

# Read command line input file

 
$input_file = shift;

 
# Read details of input file and display to user

 
$ffmpeg_input_details="ffmpeg -i ${input_file} 2>input_file.txt";

system($ffmpeg_input_details);

 
open(INPUTFILE,"input_file.txt");

@inputfile = <INPUTFILE>;

@input_file_video = grep (/Video:/i, @inputfile);

@input_file_audio = grep (/Audio:/i, @inputfile);
@input_file_duration = grep (/Duration:/i, @inputfile); 
 
print "Details for the file $input_file.\n";

print "It contains the following video data:\n"; 

print "@input_file_video\n";

print "It contains the following audio data:\n"; 

print "@input_file_audio\n";
print "It has a duration and bitrate of:\n"; 

print "@input_file_duration\n";

To use this script simply type the following at your command prompt:

perl scriptname.pl input_file.extension

Good luck extending this small script for your own uses.

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