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Posts Tagged ‘Open Movie Editor’

Open Movie Editor – New Release 0.0.20081029

October 30, 2008 Leave a comment

Popular Linux non-linear video editor, Open Movie Editor, released a new version yesterday – version 0.0.20081029.

It’s been 5 months since the last OME update and it seems that lead developer, Richard Spindler, has been busy on a couple of side projects at the same time – specifically a movie called McFinnen & Wallace.
Open Movie Editor’s latest release covers a myriad of smaller changes, all of which can be perused in the Change Log. Perhaps most interesting amongst the changes is a dependency regression to an older version of Libquiktime, apparently because many distributions have been lax in upgrading to the latest version of that library.
The latest version of OME can be downloaded from the project’s website.

Open Movie Editor Releases New Version

May 23, 2008 1 comment

Linux based non-linear video application, Open Movie Editor, has released a new version. Originally new sourced were rolled out on May 21st, with a small bug fix update now available from May 23rd.

I’ve compiled and installed the new version from source and generally it works well, with a few minor quirks that are sure to be ironed out shortly – for example the audio and video codec rendering options are woefully short of all the libraries I have installed on my machine. Never mind, I always render out a project in the highest quality anyway and then transcode directly with FFmpeg. This might not be optimal for everyone.

As usual, existing Project files are recognised (these are saved in your /home/username directory usually anyway), so work can easily continue on earlier timelines.

Features of this release include:

- Zoom buttons in timeline
- Preview in separate Window
- Images in node graphs
- Lift, gamma, gain 3-Way color-tool

The Zoom buttons are probably more intuitive for new users, although I’ve already become quite used to the old drag-the-slider zoom method. Time will tell whether this new functionality will be better.

Preview in a separate window works, but I can’t quite figure out yet how I would use it. It only previews the timeline, and not clips yet to be added to the project. Previewing clips before they’re added to the timeline would be a really useful feature.

I’ve not yet tried node based editing or the new colour correction tools.

Full release note details can be found here:

http://sourceforge.net/project/shownotes.php?group_id=142766&release_id=600862

Source code download here:

http://www.openmovieeditor.org/download.html

New FFMpeg Changes Headers Location; Breaks Stuff

May 19, 2008 Leave a comment

Recently, and it’s hard to say exactly which SVN snapshot this occured in, the FFMpeg project changed the location of a number of its header files. This has caused soem havoc with other applications that use FFmpeg for video decoding or encoding.

Amongst other things, Open Movie Editor complained that certain libraries were not installed, which they plainly were. This could be seen from running a simple “ffmpeg -i” command to see what which libraries FFmpeg had been configured again.

Trying to re-compile Open Movie Editor from source struck some problems, in that OME was looking for FFmpeg headers in the wrong place. To overcome this issue, so that OME would compile and then install correctly, I made the following changes.

The first crash will be with regards to avformat.h in the file nle_main.cxx

nle_main.cxx
and the other two files you need to make some small edits to can be
found in the “src” directory created when OME is unpacked.

There are three files you’ll need to edit in the text editor of your choice:

nle_main.cxx
VideoFileFfmpeg.H
AudioFileFfmepg.H

Open each of those files and near the beginning (around line 35) will be references that look something like this:

#include <ffmpeg/avformat.h>

You’ll need to find where avformat.h, avcodec.h and swscale.h are residing on your machine.

You can do this by using the following command:

>sudo find / avformat.h

On my machine, a build of Debian Lenny, these files can all be found in /usr/local/include

I edited the files so the code looks like this (example from VideoFileFfmpeg.H):

#include </usr/local/include/libavcodec/avcodec.h>
#include </usr/local/include/libavformat/avformat.h>
#ifdef SWSCALE
    #include </usr/local/include/libswscale/swscale.h>

Once you’ve saved those files, OME should now be able to find the FFmpeg header files and build correctly.

Hopefully a new version of Open Movie Editor will soon be available where these issues have been rectified in the source.

Open Movie Editor – New Release Feb 9th

February 10, 2008 Leave a comment

The Open Movie Editor project has just released a new version of this Linux based non-linear video editing tool.

Amongst the highlights of this new version are the following items:

  • Inclusion of a new colour scheme called Shark
  • Colour scheme preferences are now restored at restart

Full release notes are available on Sourceforge.

While only a minor update to Open Movie Editor, coming just one week after the previous release on February 3rd, this source does include my first codebase contribution to an Open Source project – the Shark colour scheme.

Download the new version of Open Movie Editor.

Real World Open Source Video Editing

February 7, 2008 1 comment

A short while ago I wrote a review about Open Movie Editor. Essentially this review was written after a couple of hours testing various video clips and assessing the functionality within OME. Now, I can write about what OME is like on a real editing assignment.

Recently I was given a DVD full of PAL DV material and asked to create a compilation from the individual clips. A fun little project that should only take a day or two. Open Movie Editor was the obvious tool for the job.

The good news I can report is that even after 10 to 12 hours of constant video editing, OME is still a very stable piece of software. I only managed to induce two crashes – once when trying to undo multiple edits in a row and once when vigorously moving clips around on the timeline. Other than that, Open Movie Editor was easily up to the task.

I’m not an advanced video editor, happy within my comfort zone using something like Adobe Premiere, but also not using all the intricate features. However, Open Movie Editor does still lack a few basic features, that would have greatly increased my productivity. Changing playback speed of a clip is not possible within OME. I needed to change the framerate of target clips using FFmpeg and mjpeg tools to achieve this effect. While fade transitions are easy enough, I’m sure they could have been even quicker if such a function was built into OME. Precise frame editing, for splitting clips for example, would also make life easier.

There are some really nice features in Open Movie Editor though. Audio automations are a breeze, the media browser window provides easy access to your video library and the list of render options is quite vast – dependent on FFMpeg, Libquicktime and other shared video libraries.

So what did I produce in my 12 hours of work? A fun 4 minute clip, which is still a little rough around the edges, but generally a good laugh. Here’s a link for your viewing pleasure:

http://kapitalmototv.co.uk/play-183-0.html

Edited in Open Movie Editor, with some clip transformations using FFmpeg and mjpeg tools. Follow this with final transcoding to x264, again with FFmpeg for more finite control, and you have an Open Source Editing project.

The Kapital Moto TV site uses open source products where possible. The server runs on Debian Etch, the site is served with Apache, built largely with PHP and data is stored in a MySQL database. Content is a mix of QuickTime generated H.264 and FFmpeg generate x264 video files. The Flash player is not open source, but is free as in beer.

How-To: Alter Video Speed with FFmpeg and mjpegtools

February 6, 2008 2 comments

Unfortunately my Linux based non-linear editing tool of choice, Open Movie Editor, doesn’t currently support directly altering video playback speed. For example, if you wanted a portion of your new compilation to run at 200% of original recorded speed, it can’t be done within OME. This exact functionality was something I needed for an existing editing project.

After some thought and investigation, such changes can be achieved through using a combination of FFmpeg and yuvfps, which is part of mjpeg tools, to alter the framerate of the desired footage. If your original file is PAL based, with a framerate of 25fps, changing the framerate to 50fps will result in the video running twice as fast, for half as long.

I didn’t initially have mjpegtools installed, but on my Debian based system this was easy enough with

sudo apt-get install mjpegtools

Next, the input video needs to be converted to yuv4mpegpipe format, passed through yuvfps and output to a new avi file. Here’s the command line I used to create a clip at 50fps:

ffmpeg -i input.dv -f yuv4mpegpipe - | yuvfps -s 50:1
-r 50:1  | ffmpeg -f yuv4mpegpipe -i - -b 28800k -y output.avi

Change the 50:1 ratios to whatever framerate you require. e.g. 100:1 for 100fps. Be sure to set the output file bitrate to a relevant quality level. Omitting this flag will result in a poor quality AVI output file by default.

The resulting AVI file was easily played back with Totem, and handled on the timeline admirably by OME.

Thanks to Victor Paesa on the FFmpeg mailing list for pointing me in the right direction.

Some other options to investigate include the new Libavfilter for FFmpeg and converting the original footage to a raw data file, which will lost the audio.

Open Movie Editor – New Release Feb 3rd

February 3, 2008 Leave a comment

The Open Movie Editor project has just released a new version of this Linux based non-linear video editing tool.

Amongst the highlights of this new version are the following items:

  • Addition of Gnome menu item, so that the application doesn’t always need to be started from the command line.
  • Split clips now retain effect information
  • Glitches removed from Timeline cursor for an enhanced editing experience
  • Improved clip zooming
  • Bug fixed where OME would crash if a clip was resized during playback of the timeline.
  • Other critical clip modifications now disabled during playback, for improved stability.

Full release notes are available on Sourceforge.

Download the new version of Open Movie Editor.

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