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Posts Tagged ‘Open Movie Editor’

Open Movie Editor – New Release 0.0.20081029

October 30, 2008 Leave a comment

Popular Linux non-linear video editor, Open Movie Editor, released a new version yesterday – version 0.0.20081029.

It’s been 5 months since the last OME update and it seems that lead developer, Richard Spindler, has been busy on a couple of side projects at the same time – specifically a movie called McFinnen & Wallace.
Open Movie Editor’s latest release covers a myriad of smaller changes, all of which can be perused in the Change Log. Perhaps most interesting amongst the changes is a dependency regression to an older version of Libquiktime, apparently because many distributions have been lax in upgrading to the latest version of that library.
The latest version of OME can be downloaded from the project’s website.

Open Movie Editor Releases New Version

May 23, 2008 1 comment

Linux based non-linear video application, Open Movie Editor, has released a new version. Originally new sourced were rolled out on May 21st, with a small bug fix update now available from May 23rd.

I’ve compiled and installed the new version from source and generally it works well, with a few minor quirks that are sure to be ironed out shortly – for example the audio and video codec rendering options are woefully short of all the libraries I have installed on my machine. Never mind, I always render out a project in the highest quality anyway and then transcode directly with FFmpeg. This might not be optimal for everyone.

As usual, existing Project files are recognised (these are saved in your /home/username directory usually anyway), so work can easily continue on earlier timelines.

Features of this release include:

- Zoom buttons in timeline
- Preview in separate Window
- Images in node graphs
- Lift, gamma, gain 3-Way color-tool

The Zoom buttons are probably more intuitive for new users, although I’ve already become quite used to the old drag-the-slider zoom method. Time will tell whether this new functionality will be better.

Preview in a separate window works, but I can’t quite figure out yet how I would use it. It only previews the timeline, and not clips yet to be added to the project. Previewing clips before they’re added to the timeline would be a really useful feature.

I’ve not yet tried node based editing or the new colour correction tools.

Full release note details can be found here:

http://sourceforge.net/project/shownotes.php?group_id=142766&release_id=600862

Source code download here:

http://www.openmovieeditor.org/download.html

New FFMpeg Changes Headers Location; Breaks Stuff

May 19, 2008 Leave a comment

Recently, and it’s hard to say exactly which SVN snapshot this occured in, the FFMpeg project changed the location of a number of its header files. This has caused soem havoc with other applications that use FFmpeg for video decoding or encoding.

Amongst other things, Open Movie Editor complained that certain libraries were not installed, which they plainly were. This could be seen from running a simple “ffmpeg -i” command to see what which libraries FFmpeg had been configured again.

Trying to re-compile Open Movie Editor from source struck some problems, in that OME was looking for FFmpeg headers in the wrong place. To overcome this issue, so that OME would compile and then install correctly, I made the following changes.

The first crash will be with regards to avformat.h in the file nle_main.cxx

nle_main.cxx
and the other two files you need to make some small edits to can be
found in the “src” directory created when OME is unpacked.

There are three files you’ll need to edit in the text editor of your choice:

nle_main.cxx
VideoFileFfmpeg.H
AudioFileFfmepg.H

Open each of those files and near the beginning (around line 35) will be references that look something like this:

#include <ffmpeg/avformat.h>

You’ll need to find where avformat.h, avcodec.h and swscale.h are residing on your machine.

You can do this by using the following command:

>sudo find / avformat.h

On my machine, a build of Debian Lenny, these files can all be found in /usr/local/include

I edited the files so the code looks like this (example from VideoFileFfmpeg.H):

#include </usr/local/include/libavcodec/avcodec.h>
#include </usr/local/include/libavformat/avformat.h>
#ifdef SWSCALE
    #include </usr/local/include/libswscale/swscale.h>

Once you’ve saved those files, OME should now be able to find the FFmpeg header files and build correctly.

Hopefully a new version of Open Movie Editor will soon be available where these issues have been rectified in the source.

Open Movie Editor – New Release Feb 9th

February 10, 2008 Leave a comment

The Open Movie Editor project has just released a new version of this Linux based non-linear video editing tool.

Amongst the highlights of this new version are the following items:

  • Inclusion of a new colour scheme called Shark
  • Colour scheme preferences are now restored at restart

Full release notes are available on Sourceforge.

While only a minor update to Open Movie Editor, coming just one week after the previous release on February 3rd, this source does include my first codebase contribution to an Open Source project – the Shark colour scheme.

Download the new version of Open Movie Editor.

Real World Open Source Video Editing

February 7, 2008 1 comment

A short while ago I wrote a review about Open Movie Editor. Essentially this review was written after a couple of hours testing various video clips and assessing the functionality within OME. Now, I can write about what OME is like on a real editing assignment.

Recently I was given a DVD full of PAL DV material and asked to create a compilation from the individual clips. A fun little project that should only take a day or two. Open Movie Editor was the obvious tool for the job.

The good news I can report is that even after 10 to 12 hours of constant video editing, OME is still a very stable piece of software. I only managed to induce two crashes – once when trying to undo multiple edits in a row and once when vigorously moving clips around on the timeline. Other than that, Open Movie Editor was easily up to the task.

I’m not an advanced video editor, happy within my comfort zone using something like Adobe Premiere, but also not using all the intricate features. However, Open Movie Editor does still lack a few basic features, that would have greatly increased my productivity. Changing playback speed of a clip is not possible within OME. I needed to change the framerate of target clips using FFmpeg and mjpeg tools to achieve this effect. While fade transitions are easy enough, I’m sure they could have been even quicker if such a function was built into OME. Precise frame editing, for splitting clips for example, would also make life easier.

There are some really nice features in Open Movie Editor though. Audio automations are a breeze, the media browser window provides easy access to your video library and the list of render options is quite vast – dependent on FFMpeg, Libquicktime and other shared video libraries.

So what did I produce in my 12 hours of work? A fun 4 minute clip, which is still a little rough around the edges, but generally a good laugh. Here’s a link for your viewing pleasure:

http://kapitalmototv.co.uk/play-183-0.html

Edited in Open Movie Editor, with some clip transformations using FFmpeg and mjpeg tools. Follow this with final transcoding to x264, again with FFmpeg for more finite control, and you have an Open Source Editing project.

The Kapital Moto TV site uses open source products where possible. The server runs on Debian Etch, the site is served with Apache, built largely with PHP and data is stored in a MySQL database. Content is a mix of QuickTime generated H.264 and FFmpeg generate x264 video files. The Flash player is not open source, but is free as in beer.

How-To: Alter Video Speed with FFmpeg and mjpegtools

February 6, 2008 2 comments

Unfortunately my Linux based non-linear editing tool of choice, Open Movie Editor, doesn’t currently support directly altering video playback speed. For example, if you wanted a portion of your new compilation to run at 200% of original recorded speed, it can’t be done within OME. This exact functionality was something I needed for an existing editing project.

After some thought and investigation, such changes can be achieved through using a combination of FFmpeg and yuvfps, which is part of mjpeg tools, to alter the framerate of the desired footage. If your original file is PAL based, with a framerate of 25fps, changing the framerate to 50fps will result in the video running twice as fast, for half as long.

I didn’t initially have mjpegtools installed, but on my Debian based system this was easy enough with

sudo apt-get install mjpegtools

Next, the input video needs to be converted to yuv4mpegpipe format, passed through yuvfps and output to a new avi file. Here’s the command line I used to create a clip at 50fps:

ffmpeg -i input.dv -f yuv4mpegpipe - | yuvfps -s 50:1
-r 50:1  | ffmpeg -f yuv4mpegpipe -i - -b 28800k -y output.avi

Change the 50:1 ratios to whatever framerate you require. e.g. 100:1 for 100fps. Be sure to set the output file bitrate to a relevant quality level. Omitting this flag will result in a poor quality AVI output file by default.

The resulting AVI file was easily played back with Totem, and handled on the timeline admirably by OME.

Thanks to Victor Paesa on the FFmpeg mailing list for pointing me in the right direction.

Some other options to investigate include the new Libavfilter for FFmpeg and converting the original footage to a raw data file, which will lost the audio.

Open Movie Editor – New Release Feb 3rd

February 3, 2008 Leave a comment

The Open Movie Editor project has just released a new version of this Linux based non-linear video editing tool.

Amongst the highlights of this new version are the following items:

  • Addition of Gnome menu item, so that the application doesn’t always need to be started from the command line.
  • Split clips now retain effect information
  • Glitches removed from Timeline cursor for an enhanced editing experience
  • Improved clip zooming
  • Bug fixed where OME would crash if a clip was resized during playback of the timeline.
  • Other critical clip modifications now disabled during playback, for improved stability.

Full release notes are available on Sourceforge.

Download the new version of Open Movie Editor.

The Grumpy Editor’s Video Journey

February 1, 2008 Leave a comment

Looking for decent reviews of many available Linux video editors? Well, besides having the audacity to think my review of Open Movie Editor is decent, someone else has taken quite a lot of time to try out other open source video editing software.

The Grumpy Editor’s Video Journey begins with capturing content from his DV camera and finally creating a DVD from it. While both these articles are worth reading, the middle part interested me most, where he expounds upon Avidemux, Kino, Cinelerra, KDEnlive, LiVES and PiTiVi.

While it’s not news to many, this set of reviews is really just someone else affirming that Linux Video Editing is not yet at a very advanced level. We can all do something about this! Get involved with a project. Devote some time and energy to helping build the video editing tool you need.

Open Movie Editor How-To: Fade to Black Transition

January 31, 2008 1 comment

After my previous overview of Open Movie Editor (OME), I decided to create a small How-To regarding an easily obtainable piece of functionality that’s not yet standard within OME.

Open Movie Editor natively contains only one transition between clips – a simple cross fade. However, one of the most used transitions in video editing is a fade to black. By adding a black still image, between two clips on a single video track in OME, it is possible to generate exactly what you need.

Here’s how by following the steps below:

1. Open your favourite image editor, in this example we’ve used the GIMP.
2. Create a new image with a solid black background, at the same size as your video clips. We’ve used PAL 720×576.
3. Save the image as a PNG, although JPG will also work.
4. Switch to Open Movie Editor and navigate to your footage in the Media Browser window. We’ve previously downloaded two QuickTime clips from stock footage supplier BBC Motion Gallery, to use in this example.
5. Add the first clip to video track one.
6. Add the black still image to the same video track.
7. Add the second video clip to the same video track.
8. Now, overlap the beginning of the black still image with the end of the first clip. A blue area with a red cross through it should appear – this is the length of time that the fade will occur.
9. Adjust the length of the black still image to suit the speed of the fade to black required.
10. Now, drag the beginning of the second video clip over the end of the still image, so that another blue box and red cross appears.
11. Move the timeline marker before the first blue box and test your fade out to and in from black.

Easy! Move the clips, and adjust the length of the black still image until you are happy with the fade.

To make is even easier, we’ve created a screen cast for you to watch, complete with a couple of extra fades created in OME. Don’t adjust your volume, there is no sound.

Get Flash Player 9 to see this movie.

var so = new SWFObject(‘http://stream0.org/flash/flvplayer.swf&#8217;,’player’,’640′,’500′,’9′);
so.addVariable(‘height’,’500′);
so.addVariable(‘width’,’640′);
so.addVariable(“displayheight”,”480″);
so.addParam(“allowfullscreen”,”true”);
so.addParam(“allowscriptaccess”,”always”);
so.addVariable(“file”,”http://stream0.org/video_files/OMEfadehowto.mov&#8221;);
so.addVariable(“backcolor”,”0×000000″);
so.addVariable(“frontcolor”,”0xCCCCCC”);
so.addVariable(‘lightcolor’,’0xCC0000′);
so.addVariable(“screencolor”, “0×000000″);
so.addVariable(“shownavigation”,”true”);
so.addVariable(“autostart”, “false”);
so.addVariable(“smoothing”,”true”);
so.addVariable(“showvolume”,”false”);
so.addVariable(“shownavigation”, “false”);
so.addVariable(“overstretch”, “fit”);
so.write(‘player’);

This screen cast was created with RecordMyDesktop, edited with Open Movie Editor, and transcoded into an x264 file, using a custom Perl script to control FFmpeg.

Open Movie Editor – Surprisingly Robust

January 30, 2008 1 comment

Despite some commentators deploring the state of Linux video editing tools, I continue to believe that somewhere out there is a non-linear editing program that is feature rich, intuitive and stable for the Linux platform. Maybe I’m deluded, but I would settle for a nice tool in its current state, that has an active community, a development road map and doesn’t crash all the time!

Yesterday, I decided to give Open Movie Editor a chance. I thought this project was largely dead, but a new release was made on January 2nd 2008, so it looks to be still very much alive. I was also somewhat put off by the screenshots on the website. The GUI looks poor and clunky. After installation I am pleased to say that this isn’t entirely the case.

Unfortunately, the packages in the Ubuntu repository are only for older versions. Installing Open Movie Editor (OME) from source was reasonably straight forward, but there are some tips and tricks worth following. To maximise the number of video formats that OME can decode, be sure to have a reasonably new version of FFmpeg installed. For rendering (encoding) output, OME uses Libquicktime. I already had FFmpeg installed, with a lot of extra libraries to cater for x264 and FAAC encoding, amongst others. I also decided to install Libquicktime from source, rather than the Ubuntu package, as configuring with –enable-shared will pickup additional libraries, like libmp3lame, libx264 and libfaac if they’re present.

Configuring OME also meant adding some new libraries to the default Ubuntu set, these included Gmerlin, libsndfile and the Alsa dev libraries. I sourced all of these from Ubuntu’s repositories and installed through Synaptic. Building OME went smoothly, although it should be noted that at the end of the process, there will not be a nice icon in the application menus. OME needs to be launched from the command line, which is actually quite handy for viewing error messages.

Once up and running, I was surprised by the GUI. It’s not nearly as bad as I feared from the screenshots, although there is still plenty of room for improvement. There are also two other skins to choose from, but unfortunately these and any other layout changes made are not remembered by OME between sessions, meaning everything needs to be setup again at startup.

My aim with OME was to perform some simple editing tasks and here’s what I found:

  • Adding clips to a project is very simple, just navigate to the folder on your local hard drive where the clip is stored, then drag it to the timline. There’s no time consuming re-factoring of clips when adding them to a new project.
  • OME supports a wide range of formats. I threw MPEG2 (m2t and vob), MOV (MJPEG and x264) and AVI (xVid and x264) files at it. They were all handled correctly. Although, it should be noted that the range of formats is dictated by your FFmpeg setup.
  • Adding new video and audio tracks is easy and straightforward
  • Splitting clips is possible using mouse clicks, but could be better with keystrokes for more accuracy.  Splitting should be performed at the exact current frame of the marker position.
  • Merging two clips together on the timeline creates a nice video crossfade, but this is the only transition available by default. To create a fade out to black, and in for the next clip, a black image must be added to the timeline between existing clips. The two existing clips then crossfade to the black image. The length of the fade is determined by the amount of clip overlap and the length of the black “image”. A little clunky, but it works well.
  • If a video clip has original audio, this can either be entirely muted, or the volume adjusted using the “Automator” tool.
  • If you just want to edit the audio of an existing video, drag and drop the file to an audio track on the timeline, rather than a video track.
  • Various effects are supported by the Frei0r video plugins. I have installed them, but not really used them, although there appears to be a wide range available.
  • There is currently no video preview available, unless the clip is already on the timeline. This means that viewing clips not already on the timeline, needs to be done outside of OME. This is a productivity loss.
  • Arbitrary clip padding, cropping and rotation is not available.
  • HD support currently not available.
  • It is not possible to move along the timeline one frame at a time with keystrokes. This can only be achieved by dragging the timeline marker with a mouse, which is not very accurate.
  • Rendering a project is straightforward with many options to choose from. This is a major strength of OME. Render options, as mentioned before, are handled through Libquicktime and so far I have no complaints.

However, the one biggest positive of OME for me is stability. I have had only two segfault crashes so far, and this was when zooming in and
out, or moving left/right on the timeline very quickly. Other Linux
NLEs I have tried – say KDEnlive or PiTiVi – crash very regularly. It
is a real plus that OME is so stable.

I’ve also had some interesting conversations with OME’s lead (and currently only) developer Richard Spindler. He’s been very helpful and patient with my inquiries. When asked about a future roadmap for OME, Richard said that it revolved around the following two points:

  • Improve the User-Interface and Editing-Feature-Set to cover most of the Basic Use Cases that an Amateur/Indie Movie Artist and Home Video Producer needs. This includes basic Compositing. 
  • Improve the Technical Backends, to RELIABLE deal with “legacy” Video Technology that is available to the general public. Compatibility to Camcorders, Video-Files and Formats, DVD-Players, etc. There remains a lot of stuff to do in that Field, for Open Movie Editor, as well as for the Linux and the Open Source/Free Software Community as a whole.

When asked if there was a desire for OME to become a Professional level video editing tool, or always aim at the Amateur/Indie/Home User, Richard felt that, “The Lines between Professional/Amateur are blurring, you can do quite amazing stuff with “cheap” HDV Camcorders today.

With Open Movie Editor I will try to do both, provide a level of quality in Image Processing and Format support that is good enough for the “Professional”, while keeping the Interface User friendly enough for Newbie users. Of course, I am not yet finished with those requirements.

As for the Interface: Ideally, the default will be simple and plain, but the more complex tools would live in Plugins and Extensions. So the Goal is definitly having both: iMovie and Final Cut Pro in one  Application. I think it is possible, the question is only how long it will take.”

I was surprised by the stability of Open Movie Editor. The interface is easy enough to use, although still with plenty of room for improvement. The addition of some extra productivity features and shortcuts will really enhance the power of Open Movie Editor. Give it a try, you might just be surprised.

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