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Posts Tagged ‘Codecs’

FFMBC 0.4 Now Available

June 25, 2010 Leave a comment

A little over one month since the release candidate was made available, FFMBC has officially rolled our version 0.4. Lots of useful and interesting updates for our favourite open source video transcoding tool:

- Sync on FFmpeg svn r21845.
- Full support for reading and writing covert art in mp3 and iTunes m4a,m4v,mp4.
- “-coverfile” commandline option to set a cover file. png,jpg,bmp supported.
- Correctly write Quicktime metadata as utf-8.
- Fixed a bug with temporal offset when muxing mpeg-2 long gop in MXF.
- Huge speedup when opening Quicktime and mpeg-4 files.
- Timecode for Quicktime and MXF files can now be set when stream copying.
- Added x264 sources in contrib directory, git 5b86182d1240b441f28462abf3d40b7371de5ba3
- Enable pthreads by default.
- Fixed a bug with interlaced VC-3 decoding.
- Integrate libavfilter. New commandline option -vf, see doc/libavfiter.texi
- Auto-rotate iPhone 3GS files.
- Support lyrics in mp3 and iTunes m4a,m4v,mp4.
- Automatically set current UTC time in created files.
- New AVFMT_HAS_PTS flag in AVInputFormat to specify that format has pts.
- Write and read metadata “reel_name” in mov timecode track if present.
- MPEG TS muxer now produces streams playable by VLC and Quicktime.
For me, the two most interesting updates in this list are the fixed VC-3 bug and the ability to now set timecode when copying QuickTime and MXF files.
FFMBC version 0.4 can be directly downloaded from here.
Categories: FFmbc, Video Tags: , , ,

Updates on WebM Support – All Aboard!

June 2, 2010 Leave a comment

As could probably be predicted, there’s been a lot more press around WebM over the last ten days or so. A few articles are worth noting.

CNET posted a reasonably ordinary piece regarding the quality of WebM, when compared against H.264. However, there were two interesting links in this piece. 
The first pointed to a WebM project page where the indepth encoding parameters for WebM content are outlined. If you’re planning to create WebM files, reading this page is essential. 
The second link, to the quAVlive website provides some various examples of H.264 (using x264) encoding compared against WebM. I can’t really see a lot of visual difference in the “Sunflower” example. However, it is easily clear to my eyes, without even enlarging the screenshots, that in “Park Joy” and “Riverbed” H.264 is certainly superior. I would like to have seen more information regarding the time taken to transcode these examples, with each codec, and the resulting file sizes. Picture quality isn’t always everything, transcode time and storage requirements should also be taken into consideration.
Everyone’s jumping on the WebM bandwagon with software and hardware support. Gstreamer claims full plugin support, which means in turn there is Moovida support and the Transmaggedon transcoder can also output VP8 codec files, although not in the Matroska/WebM container yet. Not to be outdone, Flumotion, will also stream live VP8/WebM content. The Miro Video Converter will also output valid VP8/WebM files, claiming to be the first to do so. The list could go on, but the easiest thing is to probably just keep tabs on the WebM project page listing all the supported devices and software tools, both commercial and open source.
Also worth a shout is the fact that both Mozilla and Opera are pushing for VP8/WebM to be specifically included in the HTML5 specification. Previously, major browser makers couldn’t agree on one specific video file format – Mozilla and Opera backing Ogg Theora and Apple sticking with H.264. I can’t see that particular situation changing now. 

Dirac Schrödinger 1.0.9 Released

March 9, 2010 Leave a comment

As we were on holiday last week, in the chilly snows of Austria, we almost missed an important announcement regarding the Schrödinger implementation of the Dirac codec.


It has been roughly eleven months since the last Schrödinger release, so this is indeed welcome news.

Don’t know what either Schrödinger or Dirac are? Dirac is an advanced royalty-free video compression format, initially developed by the UK’s BBC Research and Development team. To quote from the recent release announcement:

“Schrödinger is a cross-platform implementation of the Dirac video compression specification as a C library. The Dirac project maintains two encoder implementations: dirac-research, a research encoder, and Schrödinger, which is meant for user applications. As of this release, Schrödinger outperforms dirac-research in most encoding situations, both in terms of encoding speed and visual quality.”

That last sentence is really important. Previous testing by Stream0 showed that while Schrödinger was a much faster implementation than Dirac Research, the quality suffered enormously. If indeed Schrödinger has now surpassed Dirac Research in quality terms, this is exciting news.

Further information regarding enhancements in this release, and plans for a more regular release cycle, are available on the Dirac Video website.

With the increasing acceleration of HTML 5 acceptance, it’d be fantastic to see more browser support for Dirac, alongside Ogg Theora, as an alternative to the currently almost ubiquitous Flash/H.264 combination.
Categories: Codecs Tags: , ,

New FFmbc Release 0.3

November 19, 2009 1 comment

Just days after I first wrote about FFmbc (FFMedia Broadcast) the team have released a new version, marked as 0.3.

Enhancements in this version include:
  • Sync on FFmpeg svn r20539.
  • Write Quicktime timecode track.
  • Set closed gop flag for first gop when encoding with b frames.
  • Search relative path when opening Quicktime reference files.
Download the latest source, or a Windows binary, from the project homepage.
Also now included on the FFmbc wiki is a list of requested enhancements. These include support for additional codecs, bitstream validation for MPEG2 files and support for DNxHD 10-bit files. Go to the requested enhancements page to review and add your own requests to the FFmbc-user discussion group.
Categories: FFmbc, Video Tags: , ,

FFmbc – A Broadcast Media Alternative to FFmpeg

November 12, 2009 Leave a comment

FFmbc (FFMedia Broadcast) is an off-shoot of the FFmpeg project that is targeted squarely at the broadcast media world. The project while still in its infancy, but available for around 6 months already, is currently at release version 0.2. Launched and managed by Baptiste Coudurier, well known for his work on the FFmpeg project, FFmbc rolls out the following enhancements:

Import your files in Final Cut Pro or AVID Media Composer by

Creating XDCAM HD422 files in .mov or .mxf

Creating XDCAM IMX/D-10 files in .mov or .mxf
Creating AVID DNxHD files in .mov

Transcode your MPEG-2 4:2:2 Tranport stream files containing S302M audio.
Transcode your AVCHD Camera files correctly.
Merge and split your audio tracks.
Create Quicktime files containing time code tracks.
Advanced Metadata support.

ID3v2 complete support.
Itunes complete support.

We’ve been meaning to test some of FFmbc’s functionality for a while now and after a couple of false starts, we’ve been successfully able to convert a generic MPEG2 50i (50Mbps all Intra-Frame) 4:2:2 Transport Stream to IMX D-10 in a .mov container. This file contained PCM audio, which version 0.1 of FFmbc baulked at, but the latest version handled perfectly. The output IMX D10 file was imported without error directly into Final Cut Pro for editing. FFmbc has not yet renamed any FFmpeg libraries, so the same conversion syntax and commands can be used across both. Although, be careful as this may create some library conflicts if you try to have both FFmbc and FFmpeg installed at the same time.
Why would we want to use an Open Source transcoding tool in a predominantly proprietary video production environment? The answer is simple. Every commercial product we’ve investigated (Telestream’s Episode Engine and Flip Factory, Rhozet’s Carbon Coder, Digital Rapid’s Streamz) wanted to transcode our MPEG2 source file to IMX, rather than simply re-wrap the essence into IMX. Transcoding takes a considerable amount of time and will always lower the quality of the final output, no matter how minutely. FFmbc instead took our video and audio essence, extracted it from the MPEG2 Transport Stream and re-wrapped it all to IMX D10. 
Our 30 minute test file was around 16GB in size. Our test machine was a puny eeePC, with an Intel Atom N280 1.66Ghx processor, running Ubuntu Karmic Koala Netbook remix (hardly ideal for transcoding video). The entire conversion process took a little over 7 minutes, at a rate of approximately 110fps (frames per second). Pretty impressive!
There are a couple of caveats to mention with regards to FFmbc. The software is very new and Baptiste is very busy. I’m sure more developers would be a welcome addition to the project. We used the earlier Stream#0 tutorial for installing FFmpeg to achieve the same for FFmbc. However, FFmbc v0.2 didn’t like the latest SVN of x264, which is a bug that won’t be fixed until the next FFmbc release. Instead, we used the packaged libx264 from the Ubuntu repository. FFmbc then compiled and installed without error. Checking out the latest FFmbc from GIT also caused some issues The source compilation complained and failed regarding the absence of swscale. However, working around these small issues, we’ve achieved our goal – a quick conversion of a generic MPEG2 file to something that can be edited using Final Cut Pro.
FFmbc is an exciting prospect, targeted directly at the broadcast media world. If you’re looking for an open source file transcoding solution, to integrate with your Avid or Final Cut Pro editing environment, give FFmbc a chance to prove itself.

H264 Video Encoding on Amazon’s EC2

October 28, 2009 2 comments
Stream #0 recently started looking at Amazon’s EC2 computing offering. We created our first public AMI, based on Debian Squeeze, including FFmpeg and x264 pre-installed. Now that we can easily start instances with the necessary basics installed, it is time to compare the relative merits of the different instance sizes that Amazon offers.
EC2 Instances come in a variety of sizes, with different CPU and RAM capacities. We tested the 64-bit offerings, including the recently announced High-Memory Quadruple Extra Large instance.
These 64-bit instances are listed on the EC2 website in the following way:
Large Instance 7.5 GB of memory, 4 EC2 Compute Units (2 virtual cores with 2 EC2 Compute Units each), 850 GB of instance storage, 64-bit platform
Extra Large Instance 15 GB of memory, 8 EC2 Compute Units (4 virtual cores with 2 EC2 Compute Units each), 1690 GB of instance storage, 64-bit platform
High-CPU Extra Large Instance 7 GB of memory, 20 EC2 Compute Units (8 virtual cores with 2.5 EC2 Compute Units each), 1690 GB of instance storage, 64-bit platform
High-Memory Quadruple Extra Large Instance 68.4 GB of memory, 26 EC2 Compute Units (8 virtual cores with 3.25 EC2 Compute Units each), 1690 GB of instance storage, 64-bit platform
We’ll take a closer look later at the in-depth specifications of each below.
Our test file was 5810 frames (a little over 4 minutes and 285MB) of the HD 1920×1080 MP4 AVI version of Big Buck Bunny. The FFmpeg transcode would convert this to H264 using the following 2-pass command:
>ffmpeg -y -i big_buck_bunny_1080p_surround.avi -pass 1 -vcodec libx264 -vpre fastfirstpass -s 1920×1080 -b 2000k -bt 2000k -threads 0 -f mov -an /dev/null && ffmpeg -deinterlace -y -i big_buck_bunny_1080p_surround.avi -pass 2 -acodec libfaac -ab 128k -ac 2 -vcodec libx264 -vpre hq -s 1920×1080 -b 2000k -bt 2000k -threads 0 -f mov big_buck_bunny_1080p_stereo_x264.mov
Setting Threads to zero should mean that FFmpeg automatically takes advantage of the entire number of CPU cores available on each EC2 instance.
FFmpeg revealed the following information about the transcode:
Input #0, avi, from ‘big_buck_bunny_1080p_surround.avi':
Duration: 00:09:56.48, start: 0.000000, bitrate: 3968 kb/s
Stream #0.0: Video: mpeg4, yuv420p, 1920×1080 [PAR 1:1 DAR 16:9], 24 tbr, 24 tbn, 24 tbc
Stream #0.1: Audio: ac3, 48000 Hz, 5.1, s16, 448 kb/s
[libx264 @ 0x6620f0]using SAR=1/1
[libx264 @ 0x6620f0]using cpu capabilities: MMX2 SSE2Fast SSSE3 FastShuffle SSE4.1 Cache64
[libx264 @ 0x6620f0]profile High, level 4.0
Output #0, mov, to ‘big_buck_bunny_1080p_stereo_x264.mov':
Stream #0.0: Video: libx264, yuv420p, 1920×1080 [PAR 1:1 DAR 16:9], q=10-51, pass 2, 2000 kb/s, 24 tbn, 24 tbc
Stream #0.1: Audio: aac, 48000 Hz, 2 channels, s16, 128 kb/s
Stream mapping:
Stream #0.0 -> #0.0
Stream #0.1 -> #0.1
Ignore the duration, as that’s read from the file header, and we only uploaded part of the overall file.
Now to look at how each EC2 instance performed.
m1.large
(Large Instance 7.5 GB of memory, 4 EC2 Compute Units)
Firstly, querying the machine capacity (cat /proc/cpuinfo) returns the following information:
processor : 0
vendor_id : GenuineIntel
cpu family : 6
model : 23
model name : Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E5430 @ 2.66GHz
stepping : 6
cpu MHz : 2659.994
cache size : 6144 KB
physical id : 0
siblings : 1
core id : 0
cpu cores : 1
fpu : yes
fpu_exception : yes
cpuid level : 10
wp : yes
flags : fpu tsc msr pae mce cx8 apic mca cmov pat pse36 clflush dts acpi mmx fxsr sse sse2 ss ht tm syscall nx lm constant_tsc pni monitor ds_cpl vmx est tm2 ssse3 cx16 xtpr dca lahf_lm
bogomips : 5322.41
clflush size : 64
cache_alignment : 64
address sizes : 38 bits physical, 48 bits virtual
power management:
There’s 2 of these cores available. RAM is confirmed as 7.5GB (free -g).
The FFmpeg transcode showed the following:
H264 1st Pass = 11fps – 18 fps, 5 minutes 30 seconds
H264 2nd Pass = 4-5fps, 18 minutes 38 seconds
Total Time: 24 minutes, 8 seconds
m1.xlarge
Extra Large Instance 15 GB of memory, 8 EC2 Compute Units
CPU Info:
processor : 0
vendor_id : GenuineIntel
cpu family : 6
model : 23
model name : Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E5430 @ 2.66GHz
stepping : 10
cpu MHz : 2666.760
cache size : 6144 KB
physical id : 0
siblings : 1
core id : 0
cpu cores : 1
fpu : yes
fpu_exception : yes
cpuid level : 13
wp : yes
flags : fpu tsc msr pae mce cx8 apic mca cmov pat pse36 clflush dts acpi mmx fxsr sse sse2 ss ht tm syscall nx lm constant_tsc pni monitor ds_cpl vmx est tm2 ssse3 cx16 xtpr dca lahf_lm
bogomips : 5336.15
clflush size : 64
cache_alignment : 64
address sizes : 38 bits physical, 48 bits virtual
power management:
There’s 4 of these cores available. RAM is confirmed at 15GB.
The FFmpeg transcode showed the following:
H264 1st Pass = 11fps – 14 fps, 5 minutes 30 seconds
H264 2nd Pass = 6-7fps, 14 minutes 19 seconds
Total Time: 19 minutes, 49 seconds
c1.xlarge
High-CPU Extra Large Instance 7 GB of memory, 20 EC2 Compute Units
CPU Info:
processor : 0
vendor_id : GenuineIntel
cpu family : 6
model : 23
model name : Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E5410 @ 2.33GHz
stepping : 10
cpu MHz : 2333.414
cache size : 6144 KB
physical id : 0
siblings : 1
core id : 0
cpu cores : 1
fpu : yes
fpu_exception : yes
cpuid level : 13
wp : yes
flags : fpu tsc msr pae mce cx8 apic mca cmov pat pse36 clflush dts acpi mmx fxsr sse sse2 ss ht tm syscall nx lm constant_tsc pni monitor ds_cpl vmx est tm2 ssse3 cx16 xtpr dca lahf_lm
bogomips : 4669.21
clflush size : 64
cache_alignment : 64
address sizes : 38 bits physical, 48 bits virtual
power management:
There’s 8 of these cores available. RAM confirmed at 7GB.
The FFmpeg transcode showed the following:
H264 1st Pass = 24-29fps, 3 minutes 24 seconds
H264 2nd Pass = 11-13fps, 7 minutes 8 seconds
Total Time: 10 minutes, 32 seconds
m2.4xlarge
High-Memory Quadruple Extra Large Instance 68.4 GB of memory, 26 EC2 Compute Units
CPU Info:
processor : 0
vendor_id : GenuineIntel
cpu family : 6
model : 26
model name : Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU X5550 @ 2.67GHz
stepping : 5
cpu MHz : 2666.760
cache size : 8192 KB
physical id : 0
siblings : 1
core id : 0
cpu cores : 1
fpu : yes
fpu_exception : yes
cpuid level : 11
wp : yes
flags : fpu tsc msr pae mce cx8 apic mca cmov pat pse36 clflush dts acpi mmx fxsr sse sse2 ss ht tm syscall nx lm constant_tsc pni monitor ds_cpl vmx est tm2 ssse3 cx16 xtpr dca popcnt lahf_lm
bogomips : 5338.09
clflush size : 64
cache_alignment : 64
address sizes : 40 bits physical, 48 bits virtual
power management:
There’s 8 of these cores available. RAM confirmed at 68GB.
The FFmpeg transcode showed the following:
H264 1st Pass = 35-38fps, 2 minutes 47 seconds
H264 2nd Pass = 12-15fps, 6 minutes 30 seconds
Total Time: 9 minutes, 17 seconds
What can be revealed from these figures? As expected, the High-Memory Quadruple Extra Large Instance performed best, but not by much. Certainly all the additional RAM didn’t make much of an impact, and the time saving is probably really down to the slightly increased CPU specifications. Obviously, over a larger file set this time saving would be more evident.
Let’s look at which EC2 instance gives best value for money for this test. Amazon charges per CPU hour, shown below:
m1.large: $0.40/hour
m1.xlarge: $0.80/hour
c1.xlarge: $0.80/hour
m2.4xlarge: $2.40/hour
These are US Dollars and for a US based instance (European instances are slightly more expensive). Amazon has also revealed that there will be a price reduction
in effect from November 1st 2009.
Looking at the time taken to transcode our test file, on each instance, reveals the following:
m1.large
Total Time: 24 minutes, 8 seconds
Total Cost: $0.16 ((($0.40/60)/60) x 1448 seconds)
Cost per GB: $0.57 ((1024MB/285MB) x $0.16)
m1.xlarge
Total Time: 19 minutes, 49 seconds
Total Cost: $0.26 ((($0.80/60)/60) x 1189 seconds)
Cost per GB: $0.93 ((1024MB/285MB) x $0.26)
c1.large
Total Time: 10 minutes, 32 seconds
Total Cost: $0.14 ((($0.80/60)/60) x 632 seconds)
Cost per GB: $0.50 ((1024MB/285MB) x $0.14)
m2.4xlarge
Total Time: 9 minutes, 17 seconds
Total Cost: $0.37 ((($2.40/60)/60) x 557 seconds)
Cost per GB: $1.33 ((1024MB/285MB) x $0.37)
Clearly the c1.large instance represents the best value for money, although I was surprised how close behind the m1.large costs were. The additional RAM, and slightly better CPU specifications for the m2.4xlarge instance do not outweigh the much more expensive per hour cost, at least when it comes to video transcoding.
A typical HD file used for broadcast or high end post production purposes is around 85GB for 60 minutes (DnxHD at 185Mbps). Obviously the time taken to transcode this file, to an H264 at 2Mbps, could vary from the actual source content we used, but from the figures above we can estimate that it would cost $42.50 and take approximately 53.62 hours!
Taking into account that these figures may vary for different input and output files, the above should represent a worst case scenario. For example, I would expect an SD MPEG2 50Mbps file to take proportionally much less effort to transcode than a DNxHD 185Mbps HD file. Only a further test will tell……
Is Amazon’s EC2 offering worth considering for high end video file transcoding? Compared to the prices charged by Post-Production facilities it is certainly a lot cheaper, as long as you have time to wait for the end result. However, that’s the beauty of cloud based computing power – if you’re in a hurry just scale up! Keep in mind though, content still needs to be uploaded to EC2 before transcoding can begin, that’s going to take additional time and add further cost. 

How Firefox Is Pushing Open Video Onto the Web

June 20, 2009 Leave a comment

There’s a great article called How Firefox Is Pushing Open Video Onto the Web by Micheal Calore over at WebMonkey, dealing with the HTML 5 <video> tag and Firefox’s native Ogg Theora support. The piece outlines the technical details of the <video> tag and includes an interview with Mozilla director of Firefox Mike Beltzner and Mozilla director of platform engineering Damon Sicore.

An excerpt from the interview:

Webmonkey: How do you see these factors — the HTML
5 video tag, putting the Ogg codecs right into the browser,
presentation techniques that mimic the plug-in player experience –
affecting video on the web? What’s it going to change in six months? Or
six years?

Beltzner: In six months, you’re going to see more
sites like DailyMotion doing things where they detect that the browser
supports Ogg and the video tag, and in that case, they’re going to give
those users an Ogg-and-video-tag-experience.

I think you’ll see content sites doing this because they’ll have the
ability to re-encode their entire video libraries without having to pay
any licensing fees. The Ogg Theora encoders are completely license-free
and patent-proof. They don’t need to worry about which player you’ve
got. They also don’t need to worry about which hardware you’ve got. Ogg
Theora will run on Windows, Mac and Linux, or any embedded device or
mobile device built on the Linux platform.

Here’s a beta example page from DailyMotion demonstrating use of the HTML 5 <video> tag. If you have Firefox 3.5 installed, or a reasonably new version of Webkit/Safari and the XiphQT component install, you should have in browser video playback – Ogg Theora and no Flash player needed.

YouTube’s demonstration page here.

Categories: Codecs, Video Tags: , , , ,

Options for Video and Audio Codecs in Linux

February 1, 2008 Leave a comment

Red Devil’s Tech Blog has a good article reviewing how four different major Linux distributions deal with making video and audio codecs available.

Fedora, Mandriva, PCLinuxOS and Ubuntu are all covered, with Vector Linux getting a brief tongue in cheek mention at the end.

It seems that Fedora is moving away from their strictly no non-free software approach, to one encouraging end users to install Fluendo’s commercial codecs, of which new versions have just been released. Mandriva is doing something similar with their paid for 2008 Power Pack.

Personally, I applaud this approach. While I wholeheartedly support free and open source software, I also don’t mind the concept of paying a small amount for something essential, like video and audio codecs. If this is what it takes, to avoid even the sniff of legal problems for a Linux distribution, I’m fine with it.

Tip of the iceberg you say? I can understand that response too. What I don’t see at this time is a valid alternative, besides installing, what is in some jurisdictions, legally questionable software.

I’d be much more concerned about Sun purchasing MySQL and Novell/SUSE cosying up to Microsoft, than paying £20 for some very useful codecs. Perhaps an organisation like Fluendo deserves support, just to keep yourself personally in the clear.

I wonder why Ubuntu doesn’t follow this lead.

Ultimately though, I think the decision has to be up to the end user. Linux is about choice. And I’m quite the hypocrite anyway, not about to purchase Fluendo’s codecs. All the decoding functionality I need is done with libavcodec, which is a core dependency for FFmpeg.

Fluendo Updates their Codec Packs

January 29, 2008 1 comment

Although not yet noted on the Fluendo News page, customers who have previously purchased codec packs from Fluendo are receiving an email regarding updates.

In summary, here’s a list of the codecs offered by Fluendo in the Complete Set Pack:

Windows Media Audio Decoder (Windows Media 7, 8, 9, 10, Pro, Lossless and Speech)
Windows Media Video Decoder (Windows Media 7, 8, 9 and VC1)
Windows Media ASF Demuxer
Windows Media MMS Networking

MPEG2 Video Decoder
MPEG4 Part 2 (DivX) Video Decoder
H.264/AVC Video Decoder (32 bits only)
MPEG2 Program Stream and Transport Stream demuxer
MPEG4 ISO Demuxer
MP3 Audio Decoder
AC3 Audio Decoder
AAC Audio Decoder (32 bits only)

Below is the text of the email being received. It looks like some good optimisation work has been completed on the Windows Media and MPEG2 decoders:

You are receiving this mail to inform you that the Fluendo product you bought has been updated…

Here are the details on updated products :

- Windows Media Video now supports Windows Media 7 and 8 on top of
previously supported formats Windows Media Video 9 and VC1.
Additionally this codec has received a lot of optimization love which
makes it possible to play big HD clips on smaller hardware. Products
including that codec : Complete set of playback plugins, Windows Media
playback bundle, Windows Media Video.

- Windows Media Audio now supports Windows Media 10 and Windows Media
Speech on top of previously supported formats Windows Media 7, 8, 9,
Pro and Lossless. This codec has been optimized and consumes almost
50% less CPU. Products including that codec : Complete set of playback
plugins, Windows Media playback bundle, Windows Media Audio.

- MPEG2 Video decoder has been optimized to reach similar performances
than other competing decoders. Products including that codec :
Complete set of playback plugins, MPEG playback bundle, MPEG2 Video
Decoder.

- H.264/AVC and AAC have been added to the 32 bits Complete set of
playback plugins -64 bits should arrive in Q2 2008. You can now play
your AAC songs or watch QuickTime movies using a highly optimized set
of decoders for those formats. Products including that codec :
Complete set of playback plugins.

– MMS network source has been thoroughly tested with a lot of Internet
streams. Lot of improvements were done to support as much streams as
possible. Products including that network source : Complete set of
playback plugins, Windows Media playback bundle, Windows Media MMS.

Fluendo’s team wishes you a happy new year for 2008.

Best regards, Fluendo Support Team , FLUENDO S.A.

So, perhaps consider purchasing your video and audio codecs from an Open Source company, rather than installing w32codecs or Gstreamer Bad and Ugly.

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