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Cinelerra Quietly Releases New Version

October 1, 2009 Leave a comment

Without much ado, Heroine Virtual has quietly released Cinelerra 4.1 earlier this month.

A full list of detailed changes is available on the Cinelerra website.
In the race for who has the most effects in their Open Source editing tool, Cinelerra totals 58 in a list claimed not to be updated, including really useful items such a Reverse Telecine, Deinterlance and Denoise. For me, this trumps OpenShot’s Glow, Water and Echo.
After 10 minutes trawling, I can’t seem to figure out if the CinelerraCV (Community Version) is tracking to the latest code or not. There’s been no News announcements on their website since June 2009.

The Future of Cinelerra

February 8, 2008 Leave a comment

It would be remiss if I did not at least mention the current buzz around Linux video editing tool Cinelerra. An article appeared on Linux.com a couple of days ago, outlining a new direction for the software that began life as Broadcast2000.

I’m not going to do a Cinelerra history lesson here, go and read the Linux.com article. What is more interesting is the desire to build a new Cinelerra (Cin3), completely divorced from the original Heroine Warrior sponsor.

I’ve actually been following the Cin3 discussion on the Cinelerra mailing list for some time now. At this stage discussion seems to be centered around what the new name for the software will be and what GUI toolkit to use. There’s a long way to go before Cin3 – or Verite as it may now be known – becomes a stable usable product.

And that’s where the problem lies. Cin3 may be another 2 or 3 years away from being production ready. What happens in the meantime? How much effort will be expended on developing and maintaining the existing Cinelerra 2? While such a long lead time may be needed for a community driven application of this complexity, it does open the opportunity for other projects, both commercial and Open Source, to carve out a large video editing market share on the Linux platform.

Already Blender incorporates a reasonably full featured video sequence editor. I wonder about the viability of spinning that off as a standalone piece of software. What if MainConcept did indeed decide to open source their now defunct MainActor editing tool? Perhaps Adobe, or Sony, or Pinnacle will take the plunge and release a Linux version of their video editors. If the Linux desktop continues to rise in popularity, these scenarios are distinct possibilities.

Already Cinelerra suffers from an image problem, allegedly being too complex to learn and generally unstable. Let’s hope the Cinelerra community team can forge ahead quickly to create an easy to use, but powerful, open source non-linear video editor.

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