Home > Debian > In Austria: bob Breitband and the ZTE MF180

In Austria: bob Breitband and the ZTE MF180

I travel a great deal in Europe. Specifically Germany and Austria. I also use the Internet excessively. UK mobile data roaming rates are absurdly expensive. T-Mobile UK sends me a friendly text whenever I try to use data roaming informing me that it will cost £1 for 3MB, £5 for 20MB or £10 for 50MB. Crazy, and crazily expensive.

I finally decided to bight the bullet and buy a 3G data dongle in Austria. Originally I had thought to purchase something from 3 (Drei), however it seemed that everything advertised was on a two year contract. That’s not for me. Ultimately I went for a bob breitband package. This includes a ZTE MF180 3G dongle/stick and a SIM card. Buying the package for €50 was the easy bit. The package itself was €50 for the dongle, with 1GB data gratis, and then €9 for 9GB per month, on a 30 day rolling contract. €9 for 9GB isn’t too bad, although if you exceed this limit the cost is €4 per GB, which is bad. The other gotcha is that you need an Austrian bank account to setup a direct debit for the monthly payments. I won’t bore you with the details of how I have access to one of those.

After opening the package, inserting the SIM card and then plugging the dongle into my Mint Debian laptop, nothing happened. That’s right, nothing. The dongle showed a red light and Network Manager didn’t recognise any new modem. Cutting long stories short, I unplugged, plugged in, unplugged, plugged in, fiddled and swore for a good hour with no luck. At the point of the customer support help line answering, magically I obtained a connection. The light on the 3G dongle had turned blue. I had no idea how. All is good for the remainder or the day, except that the connection is slower than anticipated. Using speedtest.net, initially I was seeing a download speed of only 1.6Mbps and an upload of 0.10Mbps. Pretty poor. Later in the evening this increased to 2.6Mbps download and 0.3Mbps upload. Still not great.

This morning, I once again found it impossible to obtain a connection? Why? Why? WHY? I extracted the SIM card from the dongle and inserted it into my Nokia N900 phone. With the marvelous help of bluetooth, I easily obtained a data connection. The connection dropped occasionally, but in general all was good. The problem was not with the SIM.

Now that I had a connection again, I used our Googlian friends to search for “ZTE MF180 Debian” for answers. The answer was easy to find. Apparently, the 3G USB dongle is initially recognised as a CD-ROM drive. Eject the drive and everything works. Network Manager asks for a pin number to unlock the SIM, then one is able to connect. I don’t know why the dongle is recognised as a CD-ROM drive, and I don’t know why ejecting it fixes the problem, but it does. Thanks to Christian Amsuess for the information. If everything doesn’t work as expected after ejecting the CD drive, there is more help on Christian’s page.

The network speed is no better today, but at least I’m back online. I wouldn’t recommend bob breitband, even with the cool name, and I certainly would not recommend ZTE MF180 dongle. I’m sure ejecting the CD drive every time I need a connection will become annoying, but at least it works.

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  1. Steve
    June 13, 2011 at 02:13

    I haven’t seen your specific device, but in the US, it is common for USB dongles to have a CD portion on them that houses the Windows installation files, and is set to autorun when you plug it in. AT&T does this at least, and I have no doubt the other wireless providers do it as well, because it’s a good solution to their problem of getting the drivers installed.
    I’m not entirely sure how you get rid of it though- Sandisk at one point had a utility to remove the CD portion from their U3-enabled USB drives, which was a Windows utility.

  2. June 13, 2011 at 09:38

    Thanks Steve.

    The instructions on Christian’s page do include details regarding how to set the mode of the stick to “download,” which appears to remove the auto mounting of the CD portion of the stick.

    However, connections are still quite flakey. It takes me usually a good 10-15 minutes and 3 or 4 attempts to get the stick to connect.

    I also have here a friend’s Huawei E180 dongle with an Austrian Orange SIM in it. While it can ne a little slow to find a connection, it does so every time, without errors. Simply plug it in, enter pin and go. This stick seems to work much better in general with Debian than the ZTE MF180.

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